Burma pictures of the month

Bagan - Burma

Public Transport - Burma


Inle Lake - Burma


Myanmar has been a destination that that holds a special fascination with many. Flying into Yangon the capital is a smooth process with many options from Bangkok, China and Vietnam. The whole arrival process has been opened up recently with the availabilty of a visa on arrival or applying through the Embassy from your country of origin.


The history of Myanmar (Burma)

the history of Myanmar BurmaBurma is home to some of the early civilizations of Southeast Asia including the Pyu and the Mon. In the 9th century, the Burmans of the Kingdom of Nanzhao entered the upper Irrawaddy valley and, following the establishment of the Pagan Empire in the 1050s, the Burmese language and culture slowly became dominant in the country. During this period, Theravada Buddhism gradually became the predominant religion of the country. The Pagan Empire fell due to the Mongol invasions (1277–1301), and several warring states emerged. In the second half of the 16th century, the country was reunified by the Taungoo Dynasty which for a brief period was the largest empire in the history of Southeast Asia. The early 19th century Konbaung Dynasty ruled over an area that included modern Burma as well as Manipur and Assam.  Eventually, an expansionist British Government took advantage of Burma's political instability. After three Anglo-Burmese wars over a period of 60 years, the British completed their colonization of the country in 1886, Burma was immediately annexed as a province of British India, and the British began to permeate the ancient Burmese culture with foreign elements. Burmese customs were often weakened by the imposition of British traditions.  At the outbreak of the Second World War, Aung San seized the opportunity to bring about Burmese independence. He and 29 others, known as the Thirty Comrades, left Burma to undergo military training in Japan. In 1941, they fought alongside the Japanese who invaded Burma. fighting in BurmaThe Japanese promised Aung San that if the British were defeated, they would grant Burma her freedom. When it became clear that the Japanese would not follow through with their promise, Aung San quickly negotiated an agreement with the British to help them defeat the Japanese. Since independence in 1948, the country has been in one of the longest running civil wars among the country's myriad ethnic groups that remains unresolved.  For the next ten years, Burma's fledging democratic government was continuously challenged by communist and ethnic groups who felt under-represented in the 1948 constitution. Periods of intense civil war destabilized the nation. Although the constitution declared that minority states could be granted some level of independence in ten years, their long-awaited day of autonomy never arrived. As the economy floundered, U Nu was removed from office in 1958 by a caretaker government led by General Ne Win, one of Aung San's fellow thakins. In order to "restore law and order" to Burma, Ne Win took control of the whole country including the minority states, forcing them to remain under the jurisdiction of the central government. Although he allowed U Nu to be re-elected Prime Minister in 1960, two years later he staged a coup and solidified his position as Burma's military dictator. From 1962 to 2011, the country was under military rule. The military junta was dissolved in 2011 following a general election in 2010 and a civilian government installed. 

Since the end of military rule in mid-2011, Burma - Myanmar’s new civilian government under President Thein Sein has embarked upon a series of democratic and economic reforms. After more than sixty years of civil war, the government has secured ceasefire agreements with several ethnic armed groups.

Despite these reforms, ethnic minorities, who make up one-third of Burma/Myanmar’s population, continue to be the target of crimes against humanity perpetrated by government armed forces (Tatmadaw). On 25 May, Amnesty International reported the Tatmadaw launched indiscriminate attacks, at times directly attacking ethnic minority civilians during conflicts in Kayin, Shan, Kachin, Kayah and Mon States over the past year.